Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens in Hamamatsucho – Photo Selection in Late April

I once wrote a hotel guide in Hamamatsucho because this bay side district has both convenient transportation and attractions.

In that post, I uploaded some photos in Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens in cherry blossom season. And when I uploaded some new photos I took there recently on Flickr and Facebook, it seemed that they were quite popular.

So I am uploading new photos in Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens here as well. If you hope to book a good and convenient hotel to travel in Tokyo comfortably, please go to A Guide to Hamamatsucho – All About its Attractions, Hotels and TransportationJust enjoy photos here!

Tokyo Tower, Hamamatsucho Station and World Trade Center Building from Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens

The name of this Japanese garden might be a bit difficult, so the following translations will help you.

  • Kyu = old, former, previous.
  • Shiba = the name of the district around Hamamatsucho
  • Rikyu = imperial villa.

So it means, “a garden which once was an imperial villa in Shiba.” Get it?

This garden was built by samurais in the 17th century, and later it belonged to the loyal family. And they gave it to Tokyo City before the age of world war 2.

Well, irises are flowers of Japanese May. They bloomed before May this year because it was warm.

Irises in the Japanese Garden

 

Irises, a maple tree and pine trees

Never forget looking down at the pond.

Carp in the pond of Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens

Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens once water the pond from Tokyo Bay, but it is fresh water today. So carp can live now. So Beautiful. Isn’t it like an impressionism painting?

The season of plum blossoms and that of cherry blossoms have left in Tokyo, but there are so many spring flowers in the garden.

On the ground
Peonies with sunshades

Not only in Spring Peony Garden in Ueno, you can see some peonies with sunshades here! And late April to early May is the season of wisteria.

Benches under Wisterias
Fully Blooming Wisterias

We can see cherry blossoms there in early April, but they are not all of Japanese beauty in spring. I love these flowers, too.

Actually, Kyu Shiba Rikyu Gardens are well-designed as a Japanese garden; Views change every step, so we will never get bored when strolling. Hopefully I upload photos of the architecture.





Today I have two announcements.

1. Tumblr of Tokyo Direct Diray/Guide Opened!

Tumblr is one of the biggest social networking services in the world. It’s like a blog service and you can put others’ texts, photos, videos, links, etc, on your page by one click. (It is called “Reblog” in Tumblr. You can also Like posts just as you do on Facebook.)

There are many travel bloggers in Tumblr. And it must be important for some of you that there are some international tamagotchi fan sites.

So if you are not on Tumblr, have a look. And if you have your Tumblr page, follow me!

http://tokyodirectdiary.tumblr.com/

2. “Golden Week” is Coming in Late April to Early May

There are many public holidays in Japan in late April to early May. If you add weekends to 29 April, 3, 4, 5 May, holidays last strait almost for one week. So it is called Golden Week.

Inevitably Golden Week is a high season for tourism.

Every place where people gather holds some events.
Music, dances, performances, foods… You will meet something exciting!

For example, Cinco De Mayo Festival (Peru Festival) is in large Yoyogi Park in Harajuku.
Nine Japanese gardens in Tokyo, including Kyu Shiba Rikyu above, open 1 hour longer than normal days.
Oktober Fest is held in Odaiba. You can have German beer. It is not October?! Don’t care!
In Odaiba, we can see Hawaiian dances, too. And it must be important for some of you (including me!) that there is an event named Tamagotchi Sports Day there! If interested, see my Tumblr post, too.

They are just examples. It might be crowded, but you can see exciting events anywhere in Tokyo!

Hopefully I write something about Golden Week events – not only tamagotchi event – so keep in touch.
Enjoy fine days in May!

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